Skip to main content



Playboy cover girl and Estonian Foreign Policy
From Marko Mihkelson's Blog
Published 24 August

I do not regularly read the weekly paper The Baltic Times, but sometimes, especially whilst flying, it catches the eye. It's one of the few, if not the only English language press publications, which reflects events in the Baltics.


I am not up-to-date about who is behind this publication today and what is going on with the editorial line. But especially recently, I have noticed very bizarre editorial choice and stories of questionable journalistic value being published.


Yesterday on a plane back from Riga I picked up and read TBT's latest number (August 20-26 668). In the attached opinion piece stared back the heading: “The difficult lessons of Estonia's foreign policy”, authored by Tartu University “political scientist and foreign policy analyst” Anna-Maria Galojan


With this somewhat ambitious title she glorified herself. Galojan's story is one of strangest articles I have read about Estonian foreign policy in the last few years. She speak about how Estonian politicians and diplomats are using only their emotions to deal with democracy, human rights and economics. The example she brings forward was support last year for Georgian President Saakasvili (who was attacked in South Ossetia). What needs to happen now, is for this to be replace with disapproval (as the latter is persona non grata in the West)


It was interesting on what she based this odd opinion. Estonia has always supported both Georgian democratic reform and territorial integrity, not one or the other in policy making.


As a second example, the Playboy cover girl spoke about how Estonian foreign policy officials keep up only connections with the US Republican party. Again where did such as idea come from? The issue is not parties but policies which the administration is driving forward, be this Democrat or Republican


"Our foreign policy must also be balanced by developing positive relationships with our neighbours, including Russia, and with the very experienced British Commonwealth of Nations," Galojan points as the goal of Estonian foreign policy.


The issue is after all that our foreign policy should be consistent. Though there is always room for improvement.

But the criticisms which I have repeated here in the blog, when all is said and done, go to promote this thinking.


However Galojan's article, in all circumstance, will make quiet a few people very curious and puzzled.


I believe that TBT editors and journalists should assess the quality of stories before publishing them. I speak here as a former editor of Postimees, not as a politician active in foreign policy.


One more thought. As mentioned previously The Baltic Times is one of only a few English language news publications. There are certainly very few. In my opinion it would be extremely useful and even economically profitable to establish an English language multimedia operative news and opinion portal.



Comments

bathmate said…
it really very good.
I love it !
I like it !
thanks :)- .

Bathmate

Popular posts from this blog

Black men, Estonian women: the truth
By Abdul Turay
Published Postimees 11 November 2009
Well that got your attention; the headline I mean. Any story on this subject, the technical term is miscegenation, is bound to get punters. The yellow media, women's magazines and reality TV shows are obsessed with the subject. Not a month goes by without some publication writing about it. Anne and Style, for example, recently ran a long feature about mixed couples.
Most of these stories are muddle-headed and wrong. There's paranoia in this country that there is an army of dark-skinned men form Turkey, the tropics, some place south, who are going to make off with the nation's women. It's never going to happen. I'll explain why in a minute.
Seriously, I think there are more important things to think about and worry about. I worry about feeding my family. I worry about other people being able to feed their families, so I write about politics and economics.
But the press won't leave…
Tallinn's unlikely twin
By Abdul Turay
First published November 2008

The idea behind twinning is that two vaguely similar cities exchange cultural links for their mutual benefit. Warsaw is twinned with Coventry – both cities were flattened by the Luftwaffe, after all. Tartu, the famous Estonian university town, is twined with Uppsala which is the home to the oldest university in Scandinavia.

And Tallinn… Tallinn is twinned with Dartford. Come again, Dartford!

For those of you who don’t know Britain well, Dartford is a dull dormitory suburb on the back end of London. Dartford is in the county of Kent, the so-called “garden of England”. Technically it is both a town and a borough , but it is not a city since it doesn’t have a Royal charter to call itself that.

Say the word “Dartford” to most Britons, and they will answer back “tunnel”. The Dartford crossing is both a tunnel and a bridge. It links up Kent with London both above and below the river Thames.

When City Paper called up the town’…
Galojan will not be coming home soon. By Abdul Turay Published Postimees 27 February 2012
Anna Maria Galojan is quite a boring person. I am bored with reading about her case already. Frankly I am not that interested in her, but since I have some insider knowledge with the system she is facing, I thought I'd share it with you.
Miss Galojan claims that she is not running away by staying in the UK and if she really wanted to run she would have gone to South America.
The reverse is true. I suspect Galojan choose Britain precisely because it the best place for her or anyone else to evade justice.
Britain has a slow and inefficient bureaucracy, especially when dealing with law and order issues. If Galojan has actually claimed asylum like she says, she will be caught in this system, certainly for months and possibly for years.
Countries with a history of dictatorship, often have fast and efficient bureaucracies. Dictators need to sure that they can get rid of political opponents quickly.
The re…